Your Step-by-Step Guide to Roasting Pumpkin Seeds

If you carve a pumpkin this fall season, you might want to try roasting the pumpkin seeds instead of tossing them out after carving. Although it may seem like a complicated endeavor, roasting pumpkin seeds is actually very easy, enjoyable, and delicious. Use these simple steps to roast pumpkin seeds at home.

  1. Scoop the seeds. After you cut the pumpkin, scoop the seeds out using a large spoon. They’ll be covered in some pretty unpleasant stringy bits, so try to remove as many of those as possible while scooping.
  2. Dry with a towel. Next, dry the seeds as much as possible with a clean towel. They won’t get completely dry, but you should try to remove as much of the excess moisture as possible.
  3. Oil and season. Drizzle the pumpkin seeds with a bit of olive oil and season however you please. You can use simple salt, cinnamon, and sugar or even some spicy jalapeno if you’re feeling adventurous.
  4. Spread on a baking tray. Spread the seeds on a baking sheet, making sure to arrange them in a single layer.
  5. Roast. Finally, roast the seeds in the oven for approximately 20 to 25 minutes at 325 degrees. If you choose to, you can stir the seeds once or twice during baking to ensure that they bake thoroughly all over. Once they’re roasted, simply cool and enjoy.

How To Roast Perfect Pumpkin Seeds – Easy, Crunchy, Addictive! [Oh She Glows]
How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds [Pumpkin Patches and More]
How To Roast Pumpkin and Squash Seeds [The Kitchn]

Easy Tips and Tricks to Improve Your Memory

Bombarded by a seemingly infinite amount of obligations every day, most people fall victim to memory slips every now and then. And while you likely can't cut down on your daily duties, you can implement certain tips and tricks to help boost your memory. Here are a few:

1) Create a designated catch-all spot.
Position a small bowl or tray by your front door, and use it to hold your keys, wallet, phone, sunglasses, and other easily misplaced items. The trick here is to get into the habit of always placing said items into the catch-all as soon as you walk through the door. This way, you always know where to find those oft-misplaced items!

2) Shift into a lower gear.
Allow your brain a moment or two to catch up. For instance, instead of speeding through personal introductions, really make an effort to remember the person's name. You could make a point to repeat the name throughout your conversation, or if you exchange business cards, you could jot down some of the person's identifying factors onto the back.

3) Make a note.
Rely on sticky notes to provide visual reminders. Tape a note to your front door, alarm clock—wherever you're certain to notice the reminder.

How to Remember That Thing You Always Forget [Wise Bread]
20 Memory Tricks You’ll Never Forget [Reader's Digest]
11 tricks and tips to get the most from your memory [Harvard Health Publications]

Happy First Day Of Autumn!

In 2014, the autumnal equinox brings the fall season to the Northern Hemisphere on: September 22 at 10:29 P.M. EDT.

Questions and Answers About Fall

Question: Why aren't there exactly 12 hours of daylight and 12 hours of darkness on the fall equinox?

Answer: On the equinoxes, the very center of the Sun sets just 12 hours after it rises. But the day begins when the upper edge of the Sun reaches the horizon (which happens a bit before the center rises), and it doesn't end until the entire Sun has set. Not only that, but the Sun is actually visible when it is below the horizon, as Earth's atmosphere refracts the Sun's rays and bends them in an arc over the horizon. According to our former astronomer, George Greenstein, "If the Sun were to shrink to a starlike point and we lived in a world without air, the spring and fall equinoxes would truly have 'equal nights.'"

Question: The autumn leaves seem to be hanging on longer than usual in my neck of the woods. Is this an indication of winter weather to come?

Answer: There's an old weather proverb that states, "If autumn leaves are slow to fall, prepare for a cold winter." Or perhaps you just haven't had the kind of wind or rain needed to shake the leaves loose from their branches. But look on the bright side—you get to look at the beautiful autumn foliage for a little bit longer!

Kid-Friendly Museums in Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C.'s Smithsonian Institution provides some of the most visited museums in the world, and their vast collections have something for everyone, including the kids.

Here are two D.C. museums perfect for both kids and adults:

Smithsonian National Zoological Park
Also known as the National Zoo, the Smithsonian National Zoological Park is home to more than 400 species of animals. They offer daily tours and interactive exhibits just about every day out of the year. Stop by the Asia Trail to see the famous giant pandas, clouded leopards, and sloth bears. Go on safari through the African Savanna exhibit to find cheetahs, Cape buffalo, black rhinos, and more.

Smithsonian Museum of Natural History
See for yourself why the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History is the most visited natural history museum in the world. The kids will never grow tired of the more than 126 million natural science specimens and cultural artifacts. Enjoy a guided tour that will take you back in time, or set your gaze upon the world famous Hope Diamond. The little ones will love to walk among mummies and grow their minds with one of the richest collections of historical artifacts in the world. The museum is open 364 days a year, and admission is free of charge.

Washington Redskins 2014 Season Schedule!

The Washington Redskins are currently 1-1-0 for the 2014 Season!

Their next game is this Sunday, September 21st against the Philadelphia Eagles at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia. Tune in on FOX at 1:00 to watch!

Next up…

Thursday, Sept. 25 vs. NEW YORK GIANTS (CBS) 8:25 p.m
Monday, Oct. 6 vs. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS (ESPN) 8:30 p.m
Sunday, Oct. 12 at Arizona Cardinals (FOX) 4:25 p.m
Sunday, Oct. 19 vs. TENNESSEE TITANS (CBS) 1 p.m
Monday, Oct. 27 at Dallas Cowboys (ESPN) 8:30 p.m
Sunday, Nov. 2 at Minnesota Vikings (FOX) 1 p.m
Sunday, Nov. 9 BYE
Sunday, Nov. 16 vs. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS (FOX) 1 p.m
Sunday, Nov. 23 at San Francisco 49ers (FOX) ! 4:25 p.m
Sunday, Nov. 30 at Indianapolis Colts (FOX) 1 p.m
Sunday, Dec. 7 vs. ST. LOUIS RAMS (FOX) 1 p.m
Sunday, Dec. 14 at New York Giants (FOX) 1 p.m
Saturday, Dec. 20 vs. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES (TBD)
Sunday, Dec. 28 vs. DALLAS COWBOYS (FOX) 1 p.m

POSTSEASON:
Jan. 3-4: NFL Wild Card Weekend
Jan. 10-11: NFL Divisional Weekend
Sunday, Jan. 18: NFL Conference Championship Games
Sunday, Jan. 25: 2015 NFL Pro Bowl (University of Phoenix Stadium; Glendale, Ariz.)
Sunday, Feb. 1: Super Bowl XLIX (University of Phoenix Stadium; Glendale, Ariz.)

Beauty Is in Bloom at These Botanical Gardens in Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., is home to some of the most treasured museums in the world. These two garden-based collections are certainly the greenest, and many D.C.-based plant lovers may even say they're the most beautiful.

United States National Arboretum
Located in the heart of Washington, D.C., the United States National Arboretum is a calming retreat from the hustle and bustle of the nation's capital. Walk through numerous elaborate gardens, admiring the countless species of trees and plants. The arboretum is not only home to plants, but also houses several pieces of fine art, including "Split Ritual," a beloved American sculpture by Beverly Pepper. This historic site is also home to the National Capitol Columns, which were once an original piece of the Capitol Building's architecture.

United States Botanic Garden
Enjoy a tranquil walk at the United States Botanic Garden, which occupies the grounds of the United States Capitol. Here, you'll be reminded of the large role that plants play in our every day lives. The garden is open 365 days a year, and it frequently provides interactive classes that are both fun and educational. Stroll through the peaceful gardens on your own, or take advantage of one of the many tours this living museum has to offer.

Let’s Get Out of Town: The Cheapest Labor Day Travel Deals

Get away this Labor Day!

Here is a list of the top 10 cheapest Labor Day Travel Destinations:

1.) Orlando, Fla./Disney World
2.) Telluride, Colorado
3.) Palm Springs, California
4.) San Juan, Puerto Rico
5.) Sonoma, California
6.) Nassau Bahamas
7.) Cape Cod, Massachusetts
8.) Skaneateles, N.Y.
9.) Hilton Head Island, S.C.
10.) New York City

Easy Ways to Improve Your Typing Speed and Accuracy

Computer literacy is one of the most important skills that employers look for in a potential employee, and many jobs even ask how many words you can type per minute. These helpful tips will show you how to improve your typing speed and accuracy in just a few simple steps.

  1. Memorize the keyboard. People who are very fast typers are able type quickly because they don’t have to look at which keys they’re pressing. Study the keyboard to memorize its arrangement, and then practice typing while looking at the screen instead of your hands.
  2. Practice good posture. In order to type at your fastest rate, you need to sit up straight and place your hands in a comfortable position. Keep your arms at your sides and your wrists extended out straight and away from your body. Don’t rest your wrists on the keyboard; rather, keep them slightly elevated with just your fingers touching the keys.
  3. Time yourself. Practice by typing a long passage from a book or magazine over and over again. Time yourself during each attempt, and keep track of when your time improves. Many people also count the words that they can type per minute in order to gauge how their typing is improving.

5 Shortcuts to Increase Your Typing Speed [TypingTest.com]
5 Ways to Boost Typing Speed and Accuracy [Lifehack]
How to Improve Your Typing Speed and Accuracy [eHow]

Three Delicious Ways to Enjoy Fresh Corn on the Cob

Though corn on the cob is a summertime favorite that you enjoy every year, there are always ways to spice up this warm weather side dish. From sweet to smoky, corn can be cooked with a wide variety of different flavors. Check out these three delicious ways to prepare fresh corn on the cob, and then try one out for dinner tonight!

Roasted Corn with Oregano Butter [Martha Stewart]
It takes only a few simple ingredients to create this delightfully roasted side dish. Create the oregano butter using plain butter and fresh herbs and spices, and then spread the butter on the corn before you grill it to perfection.

Grilled Corn with Mango-Habanero Butter [Delish]
Anyone with a sweet tooth will love this sweet and spicy recipe for good old-fashioned corn on the cob. The mango-habanero butter is what gives it its unique flavor, combining the juicy taste of fresh mango with hot peppers, flavorful cilantro, and smooth, sweet honey.

Fire Roasted Grilled Corn [McCormick]
Imitate the grilled flavor of the corn served at your favorite Mexican restaurant with this recipe for Fire Roasted Grilled Corn. Grilling instead of boiling gives the corn a tender, blackened taste that simply can’t be imitated.

Two of Washington, D.C.’s Must-See Museums

Our nation's capital is home to some the most visited museums and attractions in the world. Take advantage of D.C.'s diverse cultural scene with a visit to these fascinating museums, which are two of the city's very best.

Smithsonian Museum of Natural History
Marvel at more than 126 million natural science specimens and cultural artifacts at The Smithsonian Museum of Natural History. Some of the must-see attractions include the Hope Diamond, an incredibly old, mummified cat, and the Neanderthal exhibit. Take a journey through the past at this fine American institution and see with your own eyes why it's the most visited natural history museum in the world.

International Spy Museum
Since 2002, the International Spy Museum has engaged the public with the largest collection of international espionage artifacts ever to be on display. Attempt to stay as stealthy as a spy when you participate in the exhibits and learn the important role of espionage throughout history.

Public Domain/Public Domain